Information for manufacturers and makers

Whilst as an organisation we are moving towards mass manufacturing visors with die-cut plastic, 3D printing has made a huge difference in the community during this crisis.

We have pulled together a couple of resources below to help you support your community with 3D printing.

Disclaimer: If you are considering producing visors at a large scale and/or supplying certain medical situations, it is worth checking that the designs outlined here are acceptable to the health systems in your country.  Our commercial manufacture design/process should shortly have a CE mark and therefore may be permitted where other designs may not. Check also the sterilisation requirements for medical situations.

Home Production: 

Mass Production: 

Post Production: 

Headband design

 

We suggest that you use the DK_Maker_Visir_0.9.1.stl design.  This is a remix of a Danish design, which originated from one by Hanoch Hemmerich (About HanochH)

 

Use either PLA (easier to print) or PETG (preferred).  We recommend using PETG if the visor is likely to be used in hot countries/environments. It is also easier to clean and there is a greater body of research into the efficacy of sterilisation methods for this material, making it more suitable for extended reuse.

 

Most printers can accommodate more than one visor on the print bed which makes printing large numbers easier. Also, there is no need for high resolution - printing layers of 0.3 or even 0.4mm works fine. If you can, use a larger diameter nozzle - 0.6 or even 0.8mm will greatly accelerate the print time.

Materials needed

  • PLA or PETG for printing

  • Elastic to attach for wearing

    • “Button hole elastic” (width 13mm-19mm) cut to 40mm lengths

    • or “Flat elastic” (width 3mm-20mm) cut to 75mm

    • Plastic front sheet:

      • A4 binding cover in polyvinyl acetate (PVA), polypropylene (PP) or polyester (PET)

      • 200-250 micron thickness, clear

  • Freezer bags - for packing the finished product post-sterilisation individually

Disclaimer

 

See the disclaimer above. Check the design and sterilisation requirements of the users, especially in medical situations.

3D Printed Face-Shields

Home production: Quick start, small scale

 
The Happy Shield

Home production: Quick start, small scale

 

We recommend that you look at the HappyShield, an open source design by the University of Cambridge Department of Architecture in collaboration with the University of Queensland School of Civil engineering. On the HappyShield website you can find instructions on how to make one by hand, by laser cutting or even using a laminator.  See:

By hand, with scissors or basic tools

 

Check out the videos on the above website to see how to make the shield using very few tools.  You may be able to produce many shields very cheaply this way.

 

If you have a die-cutting or vinyl cutting machine...

 

If you have, or can obtain a hobbyist/maker die-cutting or vinyl cutting machine and a few materials, you should be able to produce hundreds of visors over a few days.  We recommend that you try to obtain a cutting machine that is able to handle A3 sheets, but check out the videos for ideas for smaller sized machines.

Die-cutting/vinyl cutting machines are commercially available, e.g.:

Disclaimer

 

Please take note of the disclaimer cited in the HappyShield documentation and videos.  You may find that medical authorities near you insist on only officially approved visors.  It is worth checking before supplying.  In addition, check whether the disinfection (i.e. COVID-free but not sterile) is acceptable.

The HappyShield
Mass production, set-up time needed

If you are able to engage a commercial die-cutting manufacturer, this should allow you to scale to manufacture runs of tens of thousands of visors or more.

Technical design

 

The design we are working with is based on the HappyShield, an open source design by the University of Cambridge Department of Architecture in collaboration with the University of Queensland School of Civil engineering. We have modified it slightly in order to improve the manufacturing by die-cutting and creasing. See:
https://happyshield.github.io/en/

Disclaimer

 

Please take note of the disclaimer cited in the HappyShield documentation and videos.  You may find that medical authorities near you insist on only officially approved visors.  It is worth checking before supplying.  In addition, check whether the disinfection (i.e. COVID-free but not sterile) is acceptable.

 
Home production: Quick start, small scale
Ear Savers
 

Ear savers can be attached to material face masks to ease discomfort in prolonged wear. These can be printed quickly and will be most welcome to front line workers who need to wear a face mask every day.

Design: Follow this link or search for “Surgical_Mask_Strap_Remix.stl”

Home production: Quick start, small scale
Hands-Free Door Opener

These are attachments to door handles to enable elbow/forearm operation to minimise contact (mostly appropriate for office style doors).

Design: a number of free designs can be downloaded from the following link depending on type of door handle in place

In general the visors do not need to be sterile but they do need to be COVID-free. The virus is very sensitive to detergents, alcohols and bleach. But time is also a good way of inactivating the virus - it is known to be inactive within a range from a few hours to a few days, depending on the material and the environment.

  • We recommend that the finished products are collated, bagged and sealed in ‘quarantine’ for 5 days before distributing

    • 3D printed visors and items to be bagged individually

    • Happy shields can be bagged in ​10s or 50s to be opened by medical personnel

  • If there’s a rush, other methods for disinfection can be carried out, including:

  • All materials should be touched as little as possible when packing before distribution

  • Medical end-users should be informed that (depending on the method used) the visors may be considered free of SARS-COV-2 but not otherwise sterile

  • Always send with instructions which show end user how to wear, and instructions on re-use

Distribution

When your products have reached the Covid-free stage, take extreme care when handling them.  Always assume that you, or anyone handling the products or their packaging may already be infected with SARS-COV-2.  It is therefore useful to keep the products in sealed bags.

We have been distributing to health care organisations such as care homes, GPs, pharmacies and, more recently, primary schools as these reopen. You can try to approach organisations yourself and offer your products to them.

Alternatively, some other organisations you can contact to help you distribute your products nearby and further afield include:

You can still reach out to us with questions/technical support if you try any of the new designs - we now have an amazing community of 3D printers.

Disinfection
 
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